Photos from the Norbeck prescribed fire

These are photos taken October 20-21, 2014 at the Norbeck Section 2 prescribed fire being managed on State, Federal and private lands approximately 4 miles northeast of Pringle, South Dakota. More details about the project can be found here.

Norbeck prescribed fire
Wetting down the six-foot wide mowed firellne just outside the Wind Cave National Park boundary, before the lighters touch off the vegetation on the other side of the wire fence, meant to contain bison, but not flames.

Norbeck prescribed fire

Norbeck prescribed fire

As far as I know, there were no significant spot fires or slop-overs in the area shown above.

Norbeck prescribed fire Norbeck prescribed fire

Norbeck prescribed fire
The south end of the Norbeck prescribed fire as seen from the Rankin Ridge Lookout Tower.

Norbeck prescribed fire
Rugged terrain on the Norbeck prescribed fire — one of the reasons the interior of the project was ignited from a helicopter.
Norbeck Section 2 prescribed fire,
As the sun sets in the evening at the Norbeck Section 2 prescribed fire, cooler air begins to settle into the low lying areas, taking smoke with it.
Norbeck Rx, Sat photo, 10-21-2014
Smoke from the Norbeck prescribed fire as seen from a satellite, October 21, 2014. NASA.

Norbeck Section 2 prescribed fire

Norbeck Section 2 prescribed fire

Norbeck Section 2 prescribed fire

Norbeck Section 2 prescribed fire

Norbeck Section 2 prescribed fire
(click to enlarge)

Except as noted, all photos above were taken by Bill Gabbert and are protected by copyright.

Norbeck Section 2 prescribed fire
Satellite photo taken at 5:30 p.m. MDT, October 20, 2014, showing smoke from the Norbeck Section 2 prescribed fire in southwest South Dakota. NASA photo.

Author: Bill Gabbert

After working full time in wildland fire for 33 years, Bill Gabbert now writes about it from the Black Hills. Google+

1 thought on “Photos from the Norbeck prescribed fire”

  1. These photos are great Bill, thank you for sharing.

    Do you know of any other photograph sources, possibly aerial shots of these fires?

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