Maps of wildfires in the Northwest U.S.

More than 27,000 firefighters are deployed on wildfires in the United States.

(Originally published at 10:35 a.m. MDT September 6, 2107)

Large wildfires Washington Oregon northern California
Large wildfires currently active in Washington, Oregon, and Northern California. The red, yellow, and orange dots represent heat detected by a satellite in the 24 hour period ending at 10 a.m. MDT September 6.

These maps show the locations of large wildfires that are currently active in the Northwest United States. The red, yellow, and orange dots represent heat detected by a satellite in the 24 hour period ending at 10 a.m. MDT September 6.

large wildfires map idaho montana
Large wildfires currently active in Idaho and Montana. The red, yellow, and orange dots represent heat detected by a satellite in the 24 hour period ending at 10 a.m. MDT September 6.

According to the National Interagency Coordination Center, today there are 50 large uncontained wildfires in the United States that are being aggressively suppressed. In addition, there are another 35 fires that are not being fully suppressed.

Very large numbers of firefighting resources are currently assigned across the United States, including 560 hand crews, 1,865 engines, and 222 helicopters, for a total of 27,256 personnel.

As of yesterday 7.9 million acres has burned this year nationally, which compares to the 10-year average of 5.4 million acres for this date.

The video below shows heat and smoke in Idaho and Montana detected by a satellite on September 3 and 4, 2017.

Author: Bill Gabbert

After working full time in wildland fire for 33 years, Bill Gabbert now writes about it from the Black Hills. Google+

3 thoughts on “Maps of wildfires in the Northwest U.S.”

  1. We are planning a trip to Portland, then Crater Lake and on to the redwoods in Northern Calif to San Francisco and over to Las Vegas. Arrive in Portland on Monday Sept 18 and depart from Las Vegas on Sept 28!

    Is it safe to come to these areas at this time? We are from Illinois and not familiar with these areas and don’t know what to do, go or cancel! Can yo0u give us some insight? Thanks. Virgil & Diane

    1. Just came west on I90 to Seattle arriving Sept 7, then down I5 Sept 11. Smoke haze everywhere from mid-Montana to the ocean coming into Seattle. Varies from bothering the eyes to merely a haze dimming the sun. I5 south was mostly clear.

      There was no real danger or traffic problem but the drive varied from disappointing to unpleasant where there was smoke. A few days and different weather can make a huge difference so there is no way of predicting actual conditions more than 3-4 days ahead of time. Suggest you prepare Plan B, C, etc to reroute from pre-decided cut-out points (highway junctions). Then review reports a few days ahead and enroute and you will be able to make informed decisions.

      Look at the bright side: This way the navigator actually has some real responsible work to do!

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