Firefighters on Thomas Fire save hundreds of homes in Montecito area

Updated total of homes and commercial structures destroyed: 1,558

3-d map Thomas Fire december 17 2017

Above: 3-D map of the west end of the Thomas Fire in the Santa Barbara and Montecito area showing the perimeter at 12:30 a.m. PST December 17, 2017.

(UPDATED at 1:46 a.m. PST December 17, 2017)

Firefighters on the 269,000-acre Thomas Fire in Southern California have had good days and bad days since it started December 4, but in an epic battle Saturday they saved hundreds of homes in the Montecito area east of Santa Barbara. The Ventura County Fire Department Public Information Officer referred to it as a “BIG firefight to hold their line”.

The Incident Management Team announced Sunday that the updated total of homes and commercial structures destroyed is 1,558.

The west end of the Thomas Fire is burning on the mountain slopes in the Los Padres National Forest above Santa Barbara and Montecito but it has worked its way out of the Forest to the periphery of Montecito.

Map of the Thomas Fire
Map of the west side of the Thomas Fire. The red line was the perimeter at 12:30 a.m. PST December 17, 2017. The white line was the perimeter on December 10. Click to enlarge.

The huge blaze is now the third largest in the recorded history of California.

The winds on the west end of the fire Sunday will be out of the southwest or northwest and relatively light, but the east side could experience strong Santa Ana wind conditions — northeast winds of 25 to 40 mph with gusts to 60 mph while humidities will lower to 10 to 15 percent. The entire area is under a Red Flag Warning.

map Thomas Fire december 17 2017
Map of the Thomas Fire. The red line was the perimeter at 12:30 a.m. PST December 17, 2017. The white line was the perimeter on December 10. Click to enlarge.

Here are the latest stats from the Incident Management Team”

statistics Thomas Fire California

statistics Thomas Fire California

Author: Bill Gabbert

After working full time in wildland fire for 33 years, Bill Gabbert now writes about it from the Black Hills. Google+

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