Jupiter, seen at 130,000 mph

Jupiter photo NASA Juno

Above: Photo of Jupiter taken by NASA’s Juno spacecraft. Processed by NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt/Seán Doran.

While NASA’s Juno spacecraft is orbiting Jupiter at 130,000 mph, it takes photos every 53 days that are unlike anything I have ever seen. They are beautiful.

This last batch released by NASA was taken during the craft’s 10th close pass over the planet December 16.

Since the distance between Jupiter and Earth is about half a trillion miles (562,382,633 miles today, but it varies) it takes a long time, days or weeks, to transmit the photos  back to Earth.

Jupiter photo NASA Juno
Jupiter, photographed by NASA’s Juno spacecraft. Processed by NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt/Seán Doran
Jupiter photo NASA Juno
Jupiter, photographed by NASA’s Juno spacecraft. Processed by NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Seán Doran

Author: Bill Gabbert

After working full time in wildland fire for 33 years, he continues to learn, and strives to be a Student of Fire. Google+

4 thoughts on “Jupiter, seen at 130,000 mph”

  1. Mega fires on Jupiter, holy $&@_!
    I hope the are utilizing high reliability organizing (hro) principles. Pretty clouds though..

  2. The only thought (besides “the universe sure knows how to paint”) is gee, this has been churning around for eons, and it’s still not homogeneous.

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