Wildfire smoke Sunday, and a forecast for Monday

Above: The map shows the distribution of smoke from wildfires at 3:54 p.m. MDT September 10, 2017.

(Originally published at 5:45 p.m. MDT September 10, 2017)

The map above shows the distribution of wildfire smoke Sunday afternoon. Below are two different forecasts for Monday.

smoke map September 11, 2017 wildfire
This a forecast for the distribution of smoke from wildfires at 5 p.m. MDT September 11, 2017. NOAA.
smoke map September 11, 2017 wildfire
This a forecast for the distribution of smoke from wildfires at 1 p.m. MDT September 11, 2017. (Good luck figuring out the nine shades of red in the legend.) BlueSky.

Wildfire smoke maps, September 7, 2017

Above: The map shows the distribution of wildfire smoke during the afternoon of September 7, 2017.

(Originally published at 6:04 p.m. MDT September 7, 2017.)

The map below is the experimental forecast for noon MDT on Friday September 8, 2017. Both products are from NOAA.

smoke map wildfire
The map is an experimental product — a forecast for smoke at noon MDT on Friday September 8, 2017.

Wildfire smoke creates “unhealthy” air in the Northwest U.S. Wednesday

(UPDATED at 4:28 p.m. MDT September 6, 2017)

Map wildfire smoke
Map showing the distribution of wildfire smoke. The map was created by NOAA at 1:36 p.m. MDT September 6, 2017.

The map above showing the distribution of wildfire smoke was created at 1:36 p.m. today, Wednesday. You may notice a difference between it and the other maps below that were produced earlier Wednesday morning.

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(Originally published at 9:40 a.m. MDT September 6, 2017. We will update this information through the day on Wednesday September 6.)

Air Quality Index for the northwestern states
Air Quality Index for the northwestern states at 8 a.m. MDT September 6, 2017. AirNow.

The siege of wildfires in the Northwestern United States that has persisted for several weeks continues to produce air that humans and other animals should not breathe. On Wednesday air quality classified as “unhealthy”, “very unhealthy”, or “hazardous” exists in some areas of California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Montana.

More detailed information about locations in the following states is available from Airnow.gov:

Air Quality Index
Air Quality Index at 7 a.m. MDT September 6, 2017. AirNow.
Description of Air Quality Index (AQI) categories
Description of Air Quality Index (AQI) categories. The colors may not match those used on all maps and systems, but the category names and the actual AQI numbers should hopefully be the same.
smoke forecast pm2.5
Forecast for maximum concentrations of small particles (PM 2.5) such as those found in wildfire smoke, for September 6, 2017. BlueSky.

The image below is the forecast for small particles (PM 2.5) such as those found in wildfire smoke, for September 8, 2017.

smoke forecast
Forecast for small particles (PM 2.5) such as those found in wildfire smoke, for the Northwest at 2 p.m. PDT September 8, 2017. BlueSky.

Wildfire smoke and air quality, September 5, 2017

(UPDATED at 9:08 p.m. MDT September 5, 2017)

Here is the latest version of NOAA’s wildfire smoke tracking analysis, created at 5:36 MDT September 5, 2017.

Wildfire smoke map
Wildfire smoke map, created at 5:36 p.m. MDT September 5, 2017. NOAA.

Below is an animated version of a smoke forecast for Tuesday through Wednesday.

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(Updated at 5:47 p.m. MDT September 5, 2017)

Forecast for wildfire smoke
Forecast for wildfire smoke at 4 p.m. MDT September 7, 2017. By BlueSky.
Wildfire smoke Map
Wildfire smoke. Map created at 1:37 p.m. MDT September 5, 2017.

Here are two satellite photos of the Western United States. The first was taken on September 4 and the second was today, September 5.

satellite photo smoke wildfire
Satellite photo showing wildfire smoke, 4:17 p.m. MDT September 4, 2017. Click to enlarge.
satellite photo smoke wildfire
Satellite photo showing wildfire smoke, 12:42 p.m. MDT September 5, 2017.
Air Quality Index wildfire smoke
The AirNow map shows the Air Quality Index (combined particulates and ozone) at 8 a.m. MDT September 5, 2017.

Smoke from wildfires in the northwest United States is having a serious affect on some locations in California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana. Other areas east and southeast of these states have also been affected in recent days.

An updated version of the smoke maps we have been posting this week is not available yet Tuesday morning at 9:36 a.m. MDT. We will add it to this article when it is. We checked a couple of other wildfire smoke sites and they are also not producing updated information.

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(UPDATE at 1:10 p.m. MDT September 5, 2017)

Here is a link to an animation from satellite images that shows smoke being blown around the west. It might take a while to load. Be patient.

We checked more smoke sites and found one that is still working. Below is the forecast for smoke at 3 p.m. MDT September 5, 2017.

Smoke forecast, 3 p.m. MDT September 5, 2017
Smoke forecast, 3 p.m. MDT September 5, 2017

Satellite photo, wildfires and smoke, September 4, 2017

The satellite photo above from September 4, 2017 shows smoke created by wildfires. The red dots represent heat on the fires detected by the satellite at 1:05 p.m. MDT September 4, 2017. You can see the smoke streaming away from the fires.

Heavy smoke continues to spread across northwest and north-central US

Heavy smoke is being tracked in 12 states.

Above: Wildfire smoke map, 5:24 a.m. MDT September 4, 2017. The icons represent the locations of some of the large uncontained wildfires.

(Originally published at 10:50 a.m. MDT September 4, 2017)

The smoke from wildfires in Montana, Idaho, and the northwest United States is producing worsening conditions in the northwest and northcentral United States.

The locations that NOAA classified as having “heavy” smoke concentrations at 5:25 a.m. Monday included areas in California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, Minnesota, Iowa and Kansas.

According to the National Interagency Coordination Center, there are 58 large uncontrolled fires, but that does not count the 29 fires being managed under a less than full suppression strategy. NICC says to date 7.6 million acres have burned, compared to the 10-year average of 5.4 million acres.