Wildfire forced evacuations near Hammonton, New Jersey

(UPDATED at 8:25 a.m. EDT, May 8, 2015)

Radio transmissions from firefighters on the wildfire seven miles northeast of Hammonton, New Jersey early Friday morning indicate that the firelines are holding, preventing additional spread of the fire. At 5 a.m. there was a heavy fog in the area, which will act like a wet blanket on the fire.

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(UPDATED at 10:30 p.m. EDT, May 7, 2015)

Hammonton, New Jersey wildfire
The fire near Hammonton, New Jersey as seen from the cockpit of Air Tanker Charlie 1.

These two photos of the fire seven miles northeast of Hammonton, New Jersey were sent to us by Curt Nixholm, of Downstown Aero. They were shot at about 3:50 p.m. on May 7 from the cockpit of Charlie 1, their Air Tractor 602 air tanker on contract to the New Jersey Forest Fire Service.

Hammonton, New Jersey wildfire
The fire near Hammonton, New Jersey as seen from the cockpit of Air Tanker Charlie 1.

There is a report from New Jersey 101.5, at 9:50 p.m., that the fire has been contained.

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(Originally published at 5:45 p.m. EDT, May 7, 2015)

A large wildfire seven miles northeast of Hammonton, New Jersey forced evacuations at 2 p.m. EDT in the southern part of the state east of Route 206 between Stokes and Atsion Roads. The State Police closed Route 206 for several hours but expected to open it again around 6 p.m. EDT. The evacuations were lifted at about 5:15 p.m. EDT when extensive burnout operations stopped the spread on one side of the 710-acre fire.

Hammonton fire
Firefighters conduct burnout operations along roads to stop the spread of a fire northeast of Hammonton, New Jersey, May 7, 2015. Photo from Myfoxphilly.

The photo above clearly shows a burnout as a straight line following roads.

Hammonton fire map
The red square shows the approximate location of heat detected by a satellite at 3:27 p.m. EDT. The wildfire is on the east side of Route 206, 7 miles northeast of Hammonton, and 26 miles southeast of Philadelphia.

Author: Bill Gabbert

After working full time in wildland fire for 33 years, he continues to learn, and strives to be a Student of Fire. Google+