Remnants of tropical storm pause fire season in Southern California

Nine weather stations in San Diego County recorded more than 4 inches of precipitation

snow Mt. Laguna California

Above: Mt. Laguna Observatory in Eastern San Diego County at 8 a.m. PST November 21, 2019. HPWREN.

On Tuesday the remnants of tropical storm Raymond hit Southern California and the next day merged with a cold storm that formed in the Gulf of Alaska. The result was two waves of rain, lightning, wind, and in the higher elevations, snow.

Nine weather stations in San Diego County recorded more than 4 inches of precipitation. The highest total was at Lake Henshaw with 4.68 inches. Some of the moisture became snow at Mount Laguna 6,100 feet above sea level.

Precipitation recorded Southern California
Highest totals of precipitation recorded in Southern California during the 48-hour time period ending at 8 a.m. PST Nov. 21, 2019. NWS.

Many other locations in San Diego County received more than an inch, but farther north Riverside, San Bernardino, and Los Angeles Counties had less.

This of course will pause the fire season in these areas and may be the season-ending weather event in the locations that were dumped on with multiple inches of precipitation.

Precipitation recorded Southern California
Precipitation recorded in Southern California during the 48-hour time period ending at 8 a.m. PST Nov. 21, 2019. NWS.

Meanwhile in Northern California it was dry and very windy Tuesday and Wednesday. On Monday in the Sacramento area the Hot Dry Windy Index is predicted to be above the 95th percentile again but there is a chance of rain in the area the next day, November 26.

Hot Dry Windy Index Sacramento weather wildfires
Hot Dry Windy Index for the area 25 miles west of Sacramento, CA. Generated November 21, 2019.

Author: Bill Gabbert

After working full time in wildland fire for 33 years, he continues to learn, and strives to be a Student of Fire. Google+

2 thoughts on “Remnants of tropical storm pause fire season in Southern California”

  1. Bill,

    You reports are outstanding. You seem to always have timely, accurate and important information on the wildfire front. I try everyday to read your posts and I learn more and more everyday from your posts. Even for an old fire dawg like me, learning is a constant and important chore.

    Please keep charging and informing. We are much better for your work, much better. Best wishes and, as always, please take care, be safe, have fun and live the FF dream…

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