Maps of the Bush Fire northeast of Phoenix

Maps of the Bush Fire, northeast of Phoenix.

(UPDATED at 1:21 p.m. MDT June 21, 2020)

Central and Bush Fires Phoenix
The Central and Bush Fires in the Phoenix Area, June 21, 2020.

(UPDATED at 10:52 a.m. MDT June 20,2020)

Friday night’s mapping flight determined that the Bush Fire had burned 174,397 acres, an increase of 23,397 acres in 24 hours.

For all articles on Wildfire Today about the Bush Fire northeast of Phoenix including the most recent, click here.


(UPDATED at 8:23 a.m. MDT June 19, 2020)

Bush Fire map June 19, 2020 wildfire Arizona Phoenix Jakes Corner
The red line was the perimeter of the Bush Fire detected by a mapping flight at 11:18 p.m. MDT June 18. The yellow line was the perimeter detected by a mapping flight at 11:49 p.m. MDT June 17. The red dots represent heat detected by a satellite at 3:24 a.m. MDT June 19.

The fire has grown to 151,075 acres.


(UPDATED at 8:04 p.m. MDT June 18, 2020)

Bush Fire map 3 pm MDT June 18, 2020 wildfire Arizona Phoenix
The red line was the perimeter of the Bush Fire detected by a mapping flight at 11:49 p.m. MDT June 17. The yellow line was the perimeter detected by a mapping flight at 11:12 p.m. MDT June 16. The red dots represent heat detected by a satellite at 3 p.m. MDT June 18.

(UPDATED at 7:42 a.m. MDT June 18, 2020)

Bush Fire Vicinity Map
Vicinity map for the Bush Fire, 11:49 p.m. MDT June 17, 2020.
Bush Fire Map 254 am MDT June 18, 2020
The red line was the perimeter of the Bush Fire detected by a mapping flight at 11:49 p.m. MDT June 17. The yellow line was the perimeter detected by a mapping flight at 11:12 p.m. MDT June 16. The red dots represent heat detected by a satellite at 2:54 a.m. MDT June 18.

For all articles on Wildfire Today about the Bush Fire northeast of Phoenix including the most recent, click here.


(UPDATED at 7:25 p.m. MDT June 17, 2020)

Bush Fire map Phoenix
The red line was the perimeter of the Bush Fire detected by a mapping flight at 11:12 p.m. MDT June 16. The yellow line was the perimeter detected by a mapping flight at 12:45 a.m. MDT June 16. The orange and red dots represent heat detected by a satellite on June 17.

(UPDATED at 9:20 a.m. MDT June 17, 2020)

Map of the Bush Fire
Map of the Bush Fire at 3 a.m. MDT June 17, 2020. Data from USFS mapping flight and NASA satellites.
Map of the Bush Fire
3-D map of the Bush Fire at 3 a.m. MDT June 17, 2020. Data from USFS mapping flight and NASA satellites.

For all articles on Wildfire Today about the Bush Fire northeast of Phoenix including the most recent, click here.

map Bush Fire Arizona Phoenix
Map showing the approximate location of the Bush Fire at 2:28 p.m. MDT June 16, 2020. It is based on heat detected by satellites. This unofficial map should not be used to make decisions about safety or evacuation.
north side of the Bush Fire
Map showing the approximate location of the north side of the Bush Fire at 12:50 pm MDT June 16, 2020.
Bush Fire map Phoenix Arizona 3-D
3-D map showing the perimeter (in red) of the Bush Fire looking northeast at 11:46 p.m. MDT June 15, 2020. The yellow line was the perimeter 24 hours before.
Bush Fire map Phoenix Arizona
Map showing the perimeter of the Bush Fire (in red) at 11:46 p.m. MDT June 15, 2020. The yellow line was the perimeter 24 hours before.

A mapping flight Monday night at 11:46 determined that the Bush Fire had burned 64,513 acres.

satellite photo Bush Fire northeast of Phoenix
GOES-17 satellite photo of the Bush Fire northeast of Phoenix at 6:56 p.m. MDT June 15, 2020.
3-D Map of the Bush Fire northeast of Phoenix
3-D Map of the Bush Fire northeast of Phoenix looking southwest. The red line was the perimeter at 11:25 p.m. MDT June 14, 2020. The green line was the additional growth through 1:24 pm MDT June 15, 2020.
Map of the Bush Fire northeast of Phoenix
Map of the Bush Fire northeast of Phoenix. The red line was the perimeter at 11:25 p.m. MDT June 14, 2020. The green line was the additional growth through 1:24 pm MDT June 15, 2020.

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Author: Bill Gabbert

After working full time in wildland fire for 33 years, he continues to learn, and strives to be a Student of Fire. Google+

18 thoughts on “Maps of the Bush Fire northeast of Phoenix”

  1. I ever hiked to the area before. I think this year is extremely dry in Phoenix area. Last time it rained was in April.

  2. I live in Tonto Basin and had to evacuate. The fire threat has more destruction than just the fire. I have been a resident for only a few months as a homeowner but I discovered the best neighbors ever. The threat is that if the fire takes our homes, we’ve lost much more than just property.

    1. Im sorry you had to evacuate, but I’m certainly hoping your home and the homes of your neighbors are all safe! I have friends that own a home in Tonto Basin as well, so Im also concerned for them.
      C. Mayfield

  3. It is heartbreaking for both humans and animals. I pray that everyone stays safe. What a year this has been.

  4. Fountain Hills resident here. We’ve only been here about 2 years, never dealt with wildfires in any of our previous states. How worried should we be? Looks like things are mostly blowing NE, and we haven’t received a ‘Ready’ notification or anything.

    Thanks!

    1. There’s always a risk as any fire can spread rapidly and embers can cause a fire to jump for miles. And you are always at risk of some idiot starting a major fire by something as simple as tossing a cigarette out the car window, trailer chains dragging, fireworks, a million other things. Since you are surrounded by unpopulated areas with lots of brush like we are in the outskirts of Apache Junction it’s best to have a game plan and have important papers, important items, medicine, medicine for pets, some cash, and even a few days worth of cloths packed and ready to grab if need arises. Hopefully you never need it but the Lost Dutchman fire was a couple miles from our house a month ago and we had always talked about having things ready and didn’t. I can tell you I was running around the house trying to grab stuff quick in case we had to evacuate. Luckily for us that day the wind was not out of the SW as typical and instead blew the fire away from Hwy 88 and our neighborhood. And thankful for the wonderful fire fighters and all who help contain it to only 260 acres. Hopefully you end up having some clothes you never wear in your closet anyways packed away in a duffel bag on a shelf for your entire life.

  5. I am in the evacuation zone, and we are planning to leave soon, but we are making a fire guard about a thousand feet up from our house so hopefully if the fire does come over the mountains then our property should be safe.

  6. If your are in Fountain Hills, you will be safe. The western flank of the fire is out and is no longer spreading. The winds are pushing the fire north and east towards Tonto Basin.

  7. If you are in Fountain Hills, you are safe. The western flank of the fire is out and no longer spreading. The winds are pushing the fire north and east towards Tonto Basin where I’m at.

    1. Thanks for the response, hope you’re able to stay safe and that your property stays safe so you can make it back asap!
      Best wishes

  8. Thanks, it’s really starting to get pretty bad. We are going to try to get out sometime this afternoon before the fire makes it over the mountains.

  9. I am a native of 65 yrs , to this wonderful state. I own recreational property in Tonto. The grass in places is over 4 ft high. The summers are getting hotter, the sun is intensifying more every year. Not like old times with 100,000 population, in Phoenix. In high school the Phoenix police would drive you home if you where DUI. Road rage ,was get out at red light, hit each other a few times, and become friends. Let’s pray this fire gets stopped soon, and everyone stays safe, and Well. My personal thanks too all first responders, and the people who question the end result, NEEDS TO WALK IN YOUR SHOES. I will and do support all of you. God Bless

  10. The first looks to be spreading NE, anyone know if the southern edge is out? Is it likely to shift and move towards Apache Junction?

  11. The southern edge of the fire still has internal warmth and the far southeast corner is spreading but the winds will keep the fire well away from Apache Junction.

  12. Yesterday I drive to canyon lake see where the southeast edge was, the smoke was starting to fill the spillway canyon, but still could have been a few miles away. No fire or police presence anywhere in the area.

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