One hour of aerial video of the Apple Fire in southern California

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From ABC7

August 2, 2020 | 3:52 p.m. PDT

Apple Fire BAe-146 air tanker
Air Tanker 15, a BAe-146, drops on the Apple Fire August 2, 2020. Screenshot from ABC7 video.

A television station in Los Angeles, ABC 7, has occasionally been live-streaming video shot from a helicopter over the Apple Fire. The station has posted on YouTube 68 minutes of video that was shot today, August 2. I did not have the time to watch all of it, but I jumped around sampling different segments and found it to be fascinating. The video is below, and I have included a few screenshots.

(To see all articles on Wildfire Today about the Apple Fire, including the most recent, click here.)

I am not sure (and someone correct me if I’m wrong) but I think in the photo below, the highest point on the left, the white barren area, is Mount San Gorgonio, the highest peak in Southern California and the Transverse Ranges at 11,503 feet.

Apple Fire
Apple Fire, San Bernardino National Forest, August 2, 2020. Screenshot from ABC7 video.
Apple Fire DC-10
Air Tanker 914, a DC-10, drops on the Apple Fire August 2, 2020. Screenshot from ABC7 video.
Apple Fire
Apple Fire, San Bernardino National Forest, August 2, 2020; looking west across the San Gorgonio River. Screenshot from ABC7 video.
Apple Fire
Air Tanker 137, a B-737, drops on the Apple Fire August 2, 2020. Screenshot from ABC7 video.

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Author: Bill Gabbert

After working full time in wildland fire for 33 years, he continues to learn, and strives to be a Student of Fire. Google+

4 thoughts on “One hour of aerial video of the Apple Fire in southern California”

  1. You are correct, that is San Gorgonio peak. But as with yesterday’s ABC footage this is really just voyeurism without some commentary on location and points of reference. Not sure how this can be called journalism from ABC. Tell your audience what they are seeing and more importantly, where it is!
    This would actually inform their viewership.

  2. With over 25 years of wild land fire fighting behind me, it’s painful to watch the water and retardant drops when there are no visible ground forces to take advantage of it. These are perfect examples of wasteful spending of taxpayer dollars. “Effective” drops should be around property, not out on the slopes that will continue to burn anyway no matter how many drops are made. As for the water drops, they are totally useless unless directly on or near structures. Ask any hotshot team about this. Makes me sick to see these “great photo ops” that are so wasteful.

    1. Ted
      I can agree with you respectfully and think about how many more type 5/6 engines and tenders could be utilized to assist in extinguishing the fires within this video segment. A lack of tactics is definitely scene as well. Sometimes one must be a little aggressive and safe if opportunity is available to “put the wet stuff on the red stuff” and move on to the next fight.

      1. Right on, Chris. Unfortunately, we see this kind of waste all too often and no one seems to “monitor” or manage it for effectiveness.
        ted

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