Traffic camera keeps recording while surrounded by fire

Utah traffic camera fire swept over
The Utah DOT camera at milepost 122 continued to transmit while it was engulfed by a wildfire. Screenshot from the video below.

A highway traffic camera kept transmitting as the Milepost 122 fire swept over the site. It happened 10 miles north of Beaver, Utah on August 22 as the Milepost 122 Fire burned across Interstate 15.

The fire burned about 1,200 acres and closed the Interstate for a while.

Utah milepost 122 wildfire
Milepost 122 fire. Photo credit: Stephanie Schenck.

Goose Point Fire burns over 6,000 acres southwest of Provo, Utah

Firefighters fought fire with fire

Goose Point Fire Provo, Utah burnout
Firefighters burn out from a dozer line on the Goose Point Fire southwest of Provo, Utah. Screenshot from KSL 5 TV video.

The Goose Point Fire grew quickly when it started late Wednesday afternoon on West Mountain 11 miles southwest of Provo, Utah. After it burned through the night, firefighters on Thursday worked with dozers to fight fire with fire — burning the fuel between dozer lines and the main fire. At 11:00 a.m. Thursday firefighters using GPS equipment mapped it at 6,451 acres and soon thereafter stopped the spread.

The preliminary cause is machinery that was operating in the area, according to Dave Vickers, an area fire management officer with the Utah Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands.

Goose Point Fire Provo, Utah
Goose Point Fire on West Mountain. Photo by Jocelyn Marie Cooley.
map Goose Point Fire Provo, Utah
Map showing the location of the Goose Point Fire southwest of Provo, Utah.

The KSL 5 TV video footage below has some excellent shots of the Goose Point Fire.

Researchers study and film the depths and heights of a forest fire

The scientists captured video that is mesmerizing

Forest Service fire research
Screenshot from the USFS video below filmed in the fire.

By: Gail Keirn, Rocky Mountain Research Station-Fort Collins, Colorado; Matt Burks, Pacific Northwest Research Station-Corvallis, Oregon; John Zapell, Fishlake National Forest-Richfield, Utah
July 29th, 2019

Forest fires often reach or exceed temperatures of 2,000° Fahrenheit—that’s equivalent to one-fifth the temperature of the surface of the sun. What is the impact of such high temperatures on the soil and plants of our forests? And how do the intensity and heat of a wildfire impact its behavior, smoke and the surrounding weather?

Answering these questions is challenging since it is hard to predict when and where fires will occur. Therefore, USDA Forest Service scientists and others with the interagency Fire and Smoke Model Evaluation Experiment, or FASMEE, teamed up with the Fishlake National Forest Richfield Ranger District to study a prescribed fire from start to finish.

After months of planning and preparation, Fishlake National Forest fire crews ignited more than 2,000 acres of Utah forest in an effort to consume living upper canopy vegetation and initiate growth of new vegetation. This June 2019 prescribed fire was designed to restore aspen ecosystems by removing conifer trees and stimulating the regrowth of aspen.

Researchers at the Pacific Northwest Research Station and Rocky Mountain Research Station, as well as other FASMEE participants, saw the fire as a unique opportunity for study. Prior to the fire, Forest Service research experts took measurements of the forest vegetation and fuel loads. They also set up special fire-proof equipment to record and measure the heat of the fire throughout the project. Embedded below is a video recorded during the burn.

Forest Service fire research
Researchers prepare for the start of a prescribed fire at Fishlake National Forest. More than 40 scientists from multiple agencies participated in the effort, gathering a variety of data on the fire itself and its impacts. USDA Forest Service photo.

During the fire, scientists used LiDAR, radar, aircraft and satellite imagery, weather and atmospheric measurements, and ground monitoring to study the fuel (dead materials) consumed, fire behavior and the fire’s impact on living vegetation. Scientists will continue to monitor the area to determine how vegetation recovers after fire.

“More than 40 scientists from multiple agencies participated in the effort, gathering a variety of data on the fire itself and its impacts,” said Pacific Northwest research forester Roger Ottmar, one of the lead scientists for the project. “The data is invaluable to our efforts to predict fire behavior, smoke impacts and the short- and long-term effects of extreme fires.”

Over the next several months, scientists will gather more data as the landscape recovers, comparing burn severity maps generated from remote sensors with observed plant regrowth. Other data from the fire is already being used to validate and improve models that predict fire and smoke severity, as well as to improve firefighter safety standards and guidelines.

Building upon this success, experts are planning a similar project for later this fall to continue studying and learning about fire.

Thanks and a tip of the hat go out to Rick. Typos or errors, report them HERE.

Shelter Pass Fire burns thousands of acres west of Great Salt Lake

3-D map Shelter Pass Fire Great Salt Lake
3-D map showing the location of the Shelter Pass Fire in the Hogup Mountains west of Great Salt Lake, at 2:24 a.m. MDT August 7, 2019.

(Originally published at 3 p.m. MDT August 7, 2019)

The Shelter Pass Fire, believed to have started from lightning on Sunday, was very active Wednesday, attracting the attention at various times of two DC-10 Very Large Air Tankers, T-910 and T-911, flying out of Pocatallo, Idaho. The blaze is west of the north end of Great Salt Lake and 77 miles northwest of Salt Lake City. (see map)

The strategy is to fully suppress the fire, but with only 6 engines, 1 helicopter, and no hand crews assigned as of Tuesday night, that will be difficult until forces arrive in much greater numbers.

Wednesday afternoon the Great Basin Coordination Center said the fire had burned 8,500 acres, an increase of 7,900 acres over the size reported Tuesday evening.

As this is written at 3 p.m. MDT Wednesday, Tanker 910, a DC-10, is maneuvering over the Shelter Pass Fire preparing to drop about 9,000 gallons of fire retardant.

map Shelter Pass Fire Great Salt Lake
Map showing the location of the Shelter Pass Fire in the Hogup Mountains west of Great Salt Lake, at 2:24 a.m. MDT August 7, 2019.
Three DC-10 Air Tankers
File photo of three DC-10 Air Tankers at Albuquerque, May 3, 2019: Tankers 910, 911, and 914. Photo by Bill Gabbert.

Another fire burns in the hills above Springville, Utah

The Alaska Fire was 450 acres at 1 p.m. Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Alaska Fire Springville Utah Jocelyn Marie Cooley
A Neptune Aviation BAe-146 drops on the Alaska Fire, July 31, 2019. Photo by Jocelyn Marie Cooley.

(Originally published at 1:29 p.m. MDT July 31, 2019)

It was just two weeks ago that the Round Peak Fire was ignited by a campfire at 9:30 p.m. July 15 in the hills above Springville, Utah south of Provo. A new fire, the Alaska Fire, was reported at 11:30 p.m. on July 30th near Alaska Avenue, northeast of Springville. The cause is under investigation but there was no lightning in the area.

Wednesday at 1 p.m. MDT fire authorities said it had burned approximately 450 acres and was still moving uphill in grass and brush. A type 3 Incident Management Team will assume command of the incident today. Crews will concentrate on building fireline while supported by aircraft as needed.

Alaska Fire Springville Utah Jocelyn Marie Cooley
The Alaska Fire, July 31, 2019. Photo by Jocelyn Marie Cooley.

These photos, used with permission, were taken just before noon MDT July 31 with a long lens by professional photographer Jocelyn Marie Cooley, from her home in the Springville area. We also used one of her shots when we covered the Round Peak Fire. Thank you Jocelyn!

Alaska Fire Springville Utah Jocelyn Marie Cooley
A Neptune Aviation BAe-146 maneuvers over the Alaska Fire, July 31, 2019. Photo by Jocelyn Marie Cooley.
Alaska Fire Springville Utah Jocelyn Marie Cooley
A Single Engine Air Tanker and a Neptune Aviation BAe-146 maneuver over the Alaska Fire, July 31, 2019. Photo by Jocelyn Marie Cooley.

Firefighters stop wildfire at Springville, UT after burning 167 acres

Round Fire Utah
Round Peak Fire east of Springville, Utah.

A wildfire just east of Springville, Utah (see the map below) burned 167 acres before it was stopped by firefighters yesterday. At Wildfire Today we don’t often devote an article to a fire this size, but the Round Peak Fire is notable in two ways. One, that the U.S. Forest Service employed a different strategy from what they used last summer on the Bald Mountain and Pole Creek Fires about 8 miles to the south. Those fires were initially managed to accomplish resource management objectives. In other words, they were not suppressed, just herded around. As the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest inadequately considered fuel moistures, drought, and the weather forecast, the two fires merged and burned over 120,000 acres forcing evacuations of communities.

But the Round Peak fire, ignited by a campfire at 9:30 p.m. July 15, was suppressed. The resources the Forest Service used included 4 hand crews, 2 helicopters, 4 Single Engine Air Tankers, 1 large air tanker (MD-87), and 1 Very Large Air Tanker (DC-10).

In the video below it is difficult to determine what type of fixed wing aircraft it is, but it appears to be a DC-10, especially considering the length of the drop.

In addition to the Forest Service aggressively attacking this new fire, another reason we are writing about this fire is that numerous photos of the fire are available, supplied by Utah Fire Info and the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest.

map Round Peak Fire
Map showing the location of the Round Peak Fire east of Springville, Utah. Wildfire Today.
Round Fire air tanker drop Utah
A DC-10 drops through the smoke on the Round Peak Fire east of Springville, Utah.
MD-87 drops on the Round Peak Fire
An MD-87 drops on the Round Peak Fire east of Springville, Utah. Photo by Jocelyn Marie Cooley.
Round Fire air tanker drop Utah
A Single Engine Air Tanker drops on the Round Peak Fire east of Springville, Utah.
helicopter Round Fire Utah
A helicopter with a water bucket maneuvers over the Round Fire east of Springville, Utah. Two Single Engine Air Tankers are in the background..
Round Peak Fire air tanker drop Utah
A DC-10 drops on the Round Peak Fire east of Springville, Utah.