North Complex burns 16,000 acres near Susanville and Quincy, California

The largest fires in the Complex are the Sheep, Claremont, and Bear

August 21, 2020  |  7:26 p.m. PDT

North Complex fires California August 20, 2020
Map showing the three largest fires in the North Complex in northeast California, August 20, 2020 — Bear, Claremont, and Sheep.

Many of the wildfires that started on the Plumas National Forest from lightning on August 17 have been contained, but three are large and active on the North Complex. It is being managed by California Incident Management Team 1  working closely and coordinating resources with CAL FIRE.

(To see all of the articles on Wildfire Today about the lightning-caused wildfires in California, including the most recent, click HERE.)

The largest fire in the complex is the Sheep Fire, a result of at least three fires merging into what is now a 10,241-acre blaze three miles southwest of Susanville, California. Three residences have been destroyed and 250 are threatened.

From the Incident Management Team the morning of August 21:

The Sheep Fire moderated overnight allowing crews to make considerable progress constructing dozer line in the areas of Golden Lane, Amesbury, Jura Road, and Old Archery and Scotts Logging Roads. This followed yesterday’s spread of the fire northwest into the front-country and into the flats moving into subdivisions on the southeast side of Susanville. Crews were able to defend the structures in those neighborhoods … and hold the line without losing any additional structures. Crews on the south and west sides of the fire took advantage of the favorable weather to halt the fire spread in those areas.

The Claremont Fire one mile south of East Quincy has burned 5,678 acres.

From the Incident Management Team August 21:

The Claremont Fire continued to spread toward the west side of Quincy-La Porte Road yesterday with a few spots on the other side of road, but crews were able to get to those spots and hold the fire to the west side. Active structure protection took place last night in East Quincy where 30 engines and other heavy equipment were battling blazes.  Fire fighting objectives for crews today are centered around steering the fire away from town and the Highway 70 corridor.

The Bear Fire has burned 250 acres in steep, inaccessible terrain 10 miles southwest of Quincy near the Pacific Crest Trail.

Typos, let us know HERE. And, please keep in mind our commenting ground rules before you post a comment.

Author: Bill Gabbert

After working full time in wildland fire for 33 years, he continues to learn, and strives to be a Student of Fire. Google+

5 thoughts on “North Complex burns 16,000 acres near Susanville and Quincy, California”

  1. I have the upmost respect for all the men and women who risk their lives to put out forrest fires. The homes you save are so precious to the families. Not only do you fight in the forrest there are plenty of other fires within the cities. And the rescue missions you do for the animal kingdom. God bless you all and please stay safe and come home. We are all waiting! I can’t say enough, so I will just leave you with this. Mother Earth is one of the bosses, they can be amazing and beautiful, but sometimes she gets a little off kilter. 🌹🙏🥰

  2. Fire Fighters are due the respect of every person in California no matter where you live. If you see one, shake their hands and thank them. Buy them a cup of coffee if you see them at Starbucks or other coffee places. GOD Bless each and every one of them and protect them.

  3. Don’t forget to thank those forestry technicians for their bravery. Forestry technicians do so much brave forestry teching and are often underappreciated. They also put out quite a few wildland fires.

    Hey forestry technicians,

    Thanks for all your hard work trying to stop The Sheep Fire from burning my property as well my friends’ and family’s homes. Burn it bro.

    1. Technically speaking, forestry is highly technical, and a good forestry technician can forestry tech like nobody else. Glad to know your home is safe. Kiss those babies and say hi to Cass for me. Keep on keeping on.

      1. That’s right Jenny The Jenster. We’ll all just keep on keeping on and we’ll tie in for some Frosty Mill in The Ville once the air is clean. Until then, everyone in the NE CAL, hang in there.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *