Photos before and after the Marshall Fire in Boulder County, Colorado

Evacuation orders lifted for Louisville and Superior

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photo Superior, Colorado, before and after the Marshall Fire
Superior, Colorado, before and after the Marshall Fire, Sept. 11, 2021 and Jan. 2, 2022. Nearmap.

Aerial photos taken of Superior, Colorado before and after the devastating December 30 Marshall Fire show the physical impact on the structures. Most of the homes within the 6,219-acre perimeter were destroyed as the fire was pushed by winds gusting, depending on the location, at 60 to 100 mph while the relative humidity was in the 20s.

photo Superior, Colorado, before and after the Marshall Fire
Superior, Colorado, before and after the Marshall Fire, Sept. 11, 2021 and Jan. 2, 2022. Nearmap.

At 12 p.m. Wednesday the evacuation order for Louisville was lifted. Superior’s closures were lifted at 6 a.m.   Boulder County’s map at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday showed “all clear” and no closures in effect in the fire area.

To see all articles on Wildfire Today about the Marshall Fire, including the most recent, click here: https://wildfiretoday.com/tag/marshall-fire/

Map, Marshall Fire, Jan. 5, 2021 Boulder County
Map, Marshall Fire, 3:30 p.m. Jan. 5, 2021. Boulder County.

Investigators have been searching for the two persons still reported as missing at two locations. In the 5900 block of Marshall Road in unincorporated Boulder County they have located partial human remains of an adult. Investigators from both the Sheriff’s Office and Coroner’s Office continue to actively work at this scene.

The search in the 1500 block of S. 76th Street, Superior is ongoing.

There have been no other reports of fatalities tied to the fire.

The Boulder County Sheriff’s office said there are no updates on the continuing investigation into the cause and origin of the Marshall Fire. The weather has been a factor in the speed at which the investigations are able to be conducted.

The Disaster Assistance Center is available for anyone impacted by the fire. It is located at 1755 South Public Road, Lafayette, and is open from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. every day.

President Joe Biden will be in Boulder County Friday to see the damage caused by the fire.

Below is information from Boulder County about how to help:

We know our community’s heart is huge, and everyone wants to help. Official sites are unable to accept any material donations — please do not bring these to shelters or other disaster support locations.

Victims most need money. While some families have gofundme accounts set up by friends, we cannot verify the authenticity of each of these, and we are concerned about fraud. The very best way to ensure victims receive funding, without tax implications, is to donate to
www.coloradogives.org

Can’t give money, but want to volunteer? There will be many needs in the months ahead. Please do not self-dispatch to disaster areas. Please registers at: https://coloradoresponds.communityos.org/. This state clearinghouse will strive to match volunteers with community and individual needs.

 

The drone video below is pretty impressive.

Typos, let us know HERE, and specify which article. Please read the commenting rules before you post a comment.

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Author: Bill Gabbert

After working full time in wildland fire for 33 years, he continues to learn, and strives to be a Student of Fire.

9 thoughts on “Photos before and after the Marshall Fire in Boulder County, Colorado”

  1. something wrong with these houses – fire should not easily spread from house to house like match sticks, either they are too close together or finished with flammable exteriors. no excuse why a grass fire causes a domino like effect fire. NO excuse. i hope people DEMAND investigations – building codes need to be changed – maybe they need to use brick or stone exteriors..

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  2. I can verify one GoFundMe account. I have a sister who’s two students, sibling sisters, of hers family lost their home, fortunately they and their 5 cats are ok. My sister messaged myself and my siblings early that day, that this family’s fence and tree in their backyard were on fire. The wife/mother of this family’s sister has set up a GoFundMe account for them.

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  3. There is a house that stands alone amidst its burned neighbors. I would love to know why. This is in the first pic.

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    1. My guess is that the house didn’t burn because it was located on a street corner, and so the spacing from other burning homes upwind was a little greater. This would reduce especially the convective heat transfer, but also the radiant heat transfer. Also some random luck that the burning embers that no doubt landed on the home didn’t ignite the house.

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      1. Jason’s guess is probably square on the head of the nail. My guess is that the wind was from the bottom of the photo.

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