Fires in Yellowstone

(UPDATE at 12:30 p.m. MDT, August 19, 2013)

Alum Fire
Alum Fire, August 17, 2013. NPS photo. (click to enlarge)

Of the three significant active fires in Yellowstone National Park, the 6,150-acre Alum Fire northwest of Fishing Bridge is by far the largest and appears to have the most potential. It was discovered August 14 and did not do much until strong winds on Saturday caused it to grow to over 3,000 acres. The fire is within a mile of the Grand Loop Road north of Fishing Bridge. There is the potential for temporary closures of the road between Canyon Village and Fishing Bridge Junction. The latest road status information is available 24-hours a day by calling 307-344-2117.

Map of Alum Fire
Map of Alum Fire by NPS, August 18, 2013. The original version of this map can be found HERE. (click to enlarge)

The park reports that help is on the way:

Additional firefighters and engines arrived on Sunday and more are expected today and later in the week as fire mangers focus on protection of the road corridor, the boardwalk in Mud Volcano, and the nearby power line. As a precaution, structure protection efforts are already underway in Fishing Bridge, Lake Village, and Bridge Bay should the fire advance toward those areas in coming days. While area evacuations are not imminent, preparations are underway to assist residents and visitors in leaving the Fishing Bridge, Lake Village, and Bridge Bay area in the unlikely event that an evacuation is necessary in the coming days.

The 2,000-acre Alder Fire on a peninsula in the south end of Yellowstone Lake is constrained by water on three sides and a recent fire footprint on the other. The Druid Fire near Lamar Valley in the northeast section of the park has burned 75 acres.

The park sent out a Tweet Monday afternoon saying:

All roads leading into & through Yellowstone & all visitor services are OPEN. The Alum Fire is not a threat to visitors or residents.

Occasionally the fires can be seen from the two Mt. Washburn web cams, but sometimes drift smoke from fires outside the park degrade the visibility.

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(UPDATE at 11:30 a.m. MDT, August 18, 2013)

Map of Alum Fire at 11 p.m. MDT, August 18, 2013
Map of Alum Fire in Yellowstone National Park, showing heat detected by a satellite at 11 p.m. MDT, August 18, 2013 (click to enlarge)

The Alum Fire has grown to 3,000 acres, the Alder Fire has burned 900 acres, and the Druid Fire is 60 acres. Below is an update Saturday morning from Yellowstone National Park:

“Alum Fire: This lightning caused fire was discovered Wednesday morning, August 14, burning in the backcountry west of Mud Volcano near Alum Creek. The fire had remained fairly quiet for several days and had grown only to 3 acres as of Saturday morning. However, as critical fire weather conditions developed early Saturday afternoon the fire sprang to life. Extreme fire behavior was observed including short periods where the fire advanced through the crowns of the mature lodgepole pine forest. The fire advanced at least six miles to the east-northeast in the span of a few hours. The head of the fire is within a mile of the Grand Loop Road near Mud Volcano. The Alum Fire is now estimated at 3,000 acres. Additional firefighting resources are on their way to the park to assist with protection of the road corridor, the boardwalk in the Mud Volcano, and the nearby power line. There is the potential for temporary closures of the road between Canyon Village and Fishing Bridge Junction.

Alder Fire: This fire on a peninsula at the south end of Yellowstone Lake experienced significant fire activity again Saturday, doubling in size from 450 acres to an estimated 900 acres as it burned in heavy timber and produced a tall smoke column visible all around the lake. The fire is hemmed in by water on three sides and by a recently burned area to the south. Several backcountry campsites on The Promontory have been temporarily closed. This fire was discovered on August 14th and was caused by lightning.

Druid Fire: Gusty winds, low humidity and hot temperatures resulted in active fire behavior on the Druid Fire Saturday, which is burning in a steep heavily timbered bowl in the backcountry high above the Northeast Entrance Road on Druid Peak. The fire grew from 30 to 60 acres on Saturday, and at times some smoke and flames were visible from along the road.”

Alum Fire in Yellowstone National Park
Alum Fire in Yellowstone National Park as seen through a dirty lens and drift smoke; Mt. Washburn web cam at 11:24 a.m. MDT, August 18, 2013

Continue reading “Fires in Yellowstone”

Firefighter "roughed up" by grizzly bear

One of the firefighters working on the LeHardy fire in Yellowstone National Park on Sunday received some injuries from an encounter with a grizzly bear. According to the park:

A firefighter working on the fire received minor injuries when he was briefly roughed up by a frightened grizzly bear. The bear, acting instinctually, appeared to be trying to leave the fire area and the firefighter was unknowingly in its path. He was treated and released at the Yellowstone Clinic.

In other news about the fire on Sunday:

Firefighters on the LeHardy Fire made good progress in their efforts to create a wider fire line between the southern flank of the fire and Fishing Bridge.

Visitors could see large smoke plumes as crews conducted burn out operations to clear unburned fuels and optimize fire breaks. Cooler temperatures and slightly higher humidity aided in the progress.

Structure fire specialists arrived today to set up protection equipment in Fishing Bridge. The equipment will be kept on hand as a precautionary measure at both the sewage treatment area and in the retail areas.