Lightning, precipitation, and Red Flag Warnings, July 8, 2021

The Lolo National Forest in Montana reported two new fires Wednesday night exhibiting crowning and spotting fire behavior

9:42 a.m. MDT July 8, 2021

Lighting, 24 hours previous to 759 a.m. MDT July 8 2021
Lighting, 24 hours previous to 7:59 a.m. MDT July 8, 2021.

Wednesday’s lightning that battered parts of Washington, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota came with little or no precipitation.

Wednesday night the Lolo National Forest west of Missoula, MT reported that they were working on three new fires, including two that were each 30 to 50 acres and exhibiting crowning and spotting fire behavior.

Thursday afternoon there could be more thunderstorms in Western Montana, some of which could become severe with powerful wind and large hail. Gusty winds across the state will elevate the fire danger. The forecast for Helena calls for 13 to 16 mph winds gusting out of the northwest at 20 to 28 mph with relative humidity in the teens.

Precipitation, 24 hours previous to 840 a.m. MDT, July 8, 2021
Precipitation, 24 hours previous to 8:40 a.m. MDT, July 8, 2021.
Red Flag Warnings, July 8, 2021
Red Flag Warnings, July 8, 2021

From the Idaho Panhandle National Forests, Wednesday evening, July 7:

Widespread lightning, accompanied by very little precipitation, moved through overnight impacting the Idaho Panhandle National Forests and the greater region. Numerous fires have been reported and confirmed. The fires are all currently in the initial attack phase with an all-hands-on-deck interagency response. In addition to engines, water tenders, hand crews, and helicopters, large air tankers are also supporting fire managers with 3,000 gallon loads of retardant loading from the Coeur d Alene Tanker Base.
More information will be available as management shifts from initial attack into extended attack, if needed.

Air tankers at Pappy Boyington Field fire
Air tankers at Pappy Boyington Field in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, July 7, 2021. USFS photo.

Typos, let us know HERE, and specify which article. Please keep in mind our commenting ground rules before you post a comment.

Author: Bill Gabbert

After working full time in wildland fire for 33 years, he continues to learn, and strives to be a Student of Fire.